Annika Hernroth-Rothstein: “Turkey is all about the things we cannot see”

Annika Hernroth-Rothstein: “Turkey is all about the things we cannot see”

Istanbul is crowded with tourists, and every few feet you bump into short-skirted European women, taking selfies at a café or giggling over a boy at the local hookah-shop. It looks modern, but Turkey is all about the things you cannot see. Since July 5, 2016, this country has rejected modernity and democracy and moved toward a place where there is no true rule of law. This is why the Turkish elections matter to all of us; because they are taking place in country that is at a crossroads and where the outcome will impact the entire region in a very serious way. Erdogan has entered his 15 year in power, first as Prime Minister and now as a President with growing constitutional latitude, and if re-elected one can expect his grip to tighten, not least over the many religious and ethnic minorities that already suffer greatly under his command.

When I ask my Kurdish friend if he thinks Erdogan will leave if he loses the election, he shrugs and look at me as if the question is ill conceived:

“He has to, right? Then again, who knows? Things change in a day here, so the only lesson I have learned over the years is to not make too many predictions.”

Full column: TheRebel.media